Activities

Attractions & Historical Sites

  • Old Road Bay

    It was here at Old Road Bay that Sir Thomas Warner, along with his family and 14 others began the first permanent European settlement in the Leeward Islands. The settlers were at first on good terms with the island's Carib inhabitants, though such friendship lasted only a few yrs

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  • St. Kitts Sugar Factory and Compound

    The public opening of the factory took place on the 20th of February 1912. Three years after all the sugar estates were nationalized in 1974, the Government acquired the St. Kitts Sugar Factory. The Sugar Factory remains a national treasure and major heritage site.

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  • Independence Square

    Originally called Pall Mall Square, it was renamed when St. Kitts and Nevis achieved political independence on September 19th, 1983. The Government first acquired Pall Mall Square in 1750 and it rapidly became the administrative, commercial and social center of Basseterre.

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  • Fairview Great House & Botanical Gardens

    This 18th century Great House has been authentically restored to its former glory with careful attention to historical detail. Step back in time as you wander through the dining room with its sixteen seat mahogany dinner table and antique silver service.

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  • Spooner's Ginnery

    East of the town of Cayon is Spooner’s Estate, rich in agro-industrial history spanning both the sugar and cotton periods. The site affords fine views of the surrounding countryside and contains the only surviving cotton ginnery on the island.

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  • Charles Fort, Cleverly Hill, Sandy Point

    When the two earliest English forts at Old Road and Sandy Point Town (Hamilton Fort) fell into poor condition, it was decided, “to build a big, strong fort” on Cleverly’s Hill, “a suitable site, as ships were often becalmed beneath it.” And so Charles Fort came to be.

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  • Half Way Tree Village

    Early in 1625, Thomas Warner's small colony greeted the unexpected arrival of a French ship, probably in the shallow bay on which Basseterre now sits. The French had suffered an encounter with a Spanish warship, and they limped into St. Kitts in order to make much-needed repairs.

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  • Shadwell Great House

    Gilbert Fleming built this Great House in the second quarter of the eighteenth century. He was one of three commissioners appointed by the British Government to distribute the lands acquired from the French by the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht.

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  • St. George's Anglican Church

    In the early stages of the French occupation of Basseterre, a Roman Catholic Church, named Notre Dame, was erected by the Jesuits. Notre Dame was burnt to the ground in 1706 during the Anglo-French War by English soldiers. The Church was re-built and re-named St. George's.

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  • Belmont Estate Yard

    This former French property was less than 100 acres when Peter Brotherson acquired it early in the eighteenth century. Sugar was extracted by means of an animal mill for most of the eighteenth century.

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  • Lodge Great House

    Samuel Crooke, a planter-politician who served as a member of the Island’s Council, built this eighteenth century Great House. Samuel was the great-grandson of a Major Henry Crooke who was a resident of the island as early as 1648.

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  • The Government House

    The Blake family built this property around the time of Emancipation (1834) and soon after sold it to Thomas Harper, a planter-merchant and Vestryman. Harper named the property Springfield. Today Springfield House serves as the official residence of the Governor General.

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  • Brimstone Hill Fortress

    Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of historical, cultural and architectural significance. Over the course of 100 years, it became an almost natural outgrowth of the 800-foot hill from which it emerged.

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  • Berkely Memorial

    This memorial to the former president of the General Legislative Council, Thomas Berkeley, stands at the center of the Circus.

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  • Romney Manor

    Owned and managed by successive Earls of Romney over the centuries, no visit to St. Kitts is complete without a tour of the Historic Romney Manor and its pristine gardens.

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  • Half Way Tree Cistern

    One of the remarkable features of an island tour of St. Kitts is the system of public cisterns found in each of the villages, beautifully constructed of cut stone, each having its own design, the size reflecting the community the cistern was expected to serve.

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  • Carib Petroglyphs

    As you approach the entrance to the Wingfield Manor Estate, you will find fascinating Carib Petroglyphs. These drawings show two of the original carvings drawn by the Caribs, perhaps depicting images of their Zemi or gods.

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  • Church of the Immaculate Conception

    After the take-over of the island by the English in 1713, Roman Catholics were forbidden by law to worship in public. They also were prohibited from civil or military office unless they took and subscribed to certain oaths and declarations.

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  • Wingfield River and Water Works

    After the evictions of the Caribs, the English settled the lands in the area and cultivated tobacco, ginger, indigo and cotton. With the introduction of sugar in the 1640’s, Wingfield developed into a major sugar plantation & one of the very few to use water to power its factory.

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  • Old Treasury Building

    Lady Haynes-Smith laid the foundation stone for the Treasury Building in 1894. The building, “a two-story stone structure … is stylistically Georgian Architecture, adapted to the Caribbean, and axially related to Fort Street and the former Treasury Pier..."

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  • Bloody Point

    Joining forces with Caribs, Chief Tegremare prepared to attack the European settlements. Meanwhile, despite growing animosity between the French and the British, the 2 communities put aside their differences in order to mount a combined attack on the Carib, killing over 2,000.

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  • Springfield Cemetary and Chapel

    Until the Cholera Epidemic in 1854, all burials would take place in churchyard cemeteries. It was estimated that one sixth of the population died from the disease. To solve the 'dangerous' health problem posed by the cholera epidemic, the Government purchased land at Springfield.

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  • The St. Kitts Scenic Railway Ltd.

    St. Kitts has one of the few remaining operational rail tracks in the Caribbean. Begun in 1910 as part of the 20th Century modernization thrust in the sugar industry, this narrow gauge railway remains in use today. It runs around the major part of the island.

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  • Georgian House

    This structure remains one of the more outstanding examples of 18th Century urban architecture on St. Kitts. It is located on South Square Street, South of Independence Square, and along with other buildings, is thought to have at one time stored slaves in its cellars.

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  • La Guerite Reservoir

    La Guerite Reservoir serves the town of Basseterre and its environs. There is an interesting piece of architecture at its entrance, a retaining wall supporting the large undercover reservoir. It is believed to be a 19th century structure built around 1869.

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